WELCOME TO REVELATION!

B7085C27-B58B-4D0E-9E7D-DB7FD7E386A2WELCOME TO REVELATION!

There is no other book in the New Testament like Revelation. For centuries credible interpreters of Scripture have wrestled with the best way to understand Revelation. For instance, John Calvin never wrote a commentary on Revelation- even though he wrote commentaries on every other New Testament book, (except the two tiny books  of 2 and 3 John). It’s believed by many that Calvin didn’t write a commentary on Revelation because he didn’t understand it.
Martin Luther was even more confused about Revelation. He recommended taking it out of the New Testament! Fortunately, he was unsuccessful.
Why is Revelation hard to understand? It’s difficult because we aren’t use to apocalyptic literature. Revelation is apocalyptic literature which uses symbols, numbers, and animals which we’ve never seen to do things that seem impossible. It’s truth communicated in a different way than we are used to seeing in the New Testament. Apocalyptic literature is prophecy drenched in highly symbolic language.
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The book is addressed to a group of churches we usually think of as “the seven churches in Asia Minor.” These churches, all located in modern Turkey, were experiencing persecution. John, the last living Apostle, the author of Revelation, looks to the future when God will judge evil and justify His people. The final judgment of the earth as well as the final glory of God’s Kingdom are both described using symbols and vivid imaginative language.
Revelation is the picture of our future when Christ gathers His people into His Kingdom once and for all. It’s a confusing book at times but more importantly it’s an encouraging book for us because it’s filled with promises of our Lord’s final victory.
As you read Revelation be encouraged by what Jesus says and does because His future is the future of every believer! We’re with Him.
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WELCOME TO JUDE!

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WELCOME TO JUDE!

Jude is a brief letter written to spotlight error. The half brother of Jesus and full brother of James is aware of false teachers who deliberately corrupt the church for their own selfish reasons. In verse 12 he uses some of the most picturesque language to describe the heretical intruders. He calls them “… hidden reefs at your love feasts…waterless clouds, swept along by winds; fruitless trees in late autumn, twice dead.”
Jude is unhesitatingly critical and pronounces judgment on the false teachers. This is a message our culture will not immediately accept because it runs contrary to the popular but false view that New Testament Christianity is only a message of love. God’s love is real but so is inevitable judgement.
Jude also urges believers to remain faithful and to take responsibility for their own spiritual safety by  “…building yourselves up in your most holy faith and praying in the Holy Spirit” and he urges us to “…keep yourselves in the love of God, waiting for the mercy of our Lord Jesus Christ that leads to eternal life” (vv.20-21).
The phrase “praying in the Holy Spirit” is intriguing, especially to those who long to seize every advantage in prayer. Clearly we could wish we had more definition about what it means to pray in the Spirit but Jude assumes the readers understand it. Even though little explanation is given about what it means to “pray in the Spirit”, the context suggests it’s part of the process of building ourselves up in the faith and remaining unswayed by false teachers.
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Jude is relevant for us today as a corrective in our culture of false teachers and half truths masquerading as the gospel. When we read Jude we are reminded the reality of God’s grace never eliminates the certainty of God’s judgement. We are also encouraged by the fact God’s grace protects us from His judgment!
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